Abstract 19(2)

Bangladesh j. entomol. (2009) 19(2), 1-8

CONTROLLING TERMITE (ODONTOTERMES GIRIENSIS ROONWAL AND CHHOTANI) IN THE MOUND BY USING CHEMICAL, NON-CHEMICAL APPROACHES AND THEIR COMBINATIONS IN FOREST ECOSYSTEM OF GAZIPUR

S. M. Z. ABEDIN1, M. Z. ALAM2, M. I. H. MIAH3, M. M. HOSSAIN4 & M. M. A. SARDAR5

1Depertment of Agricultural Extension, Farmgate, Dhaka; 2Department of Entomology, BSMRAU, Gazipur; 3Department of Plant Pathology, BSMRAU, Gazipur; 4Department of Horticulture, BSMRAU, Gazipur & 5Department of Entomology, BAU, Mymensingh.

ABSTRACT

The management strategy of termites (Odontotermes giriensis Roonwal & Chhotani) in the present study included controlling them in the mound by using some selected chemicals and non-chemical approaches and their combinations and it was conducted at Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Agricultural University (BSMRAU) campus located at Gazipur forest ecosystem. Trial utilizing Dursban 20EC @ 1 ml/1, Aktara 25 WG @ 1 g/1, Cruiser 70WS @ 1g/1, Gaucho 70WS@ 1g/1, eradicating queen by nest destruction and breaking nest by mechanical drilling, all were equally effective in controlling O.giriensis Roonwal & Chhotani in the mound if applied separately or in combinations.Their effectiveness was determined on the basis of reducing number of queen, fungus garden, workers, soldiers, nymphs and bromatia.

Bangladesh j. entomol. (2009) 19(2), 9-20

SEASONAL POLYMORPHISM OF NYMPHALID BUTTERFLIES INATOMIC ENERGY RESEARCH ESTABLISHMENT (AERE) CAMPUSAND ADJACENT AREAS, SAVAR, DHAKA, BANGLADESH

A.T.M.F. ISLAM1*, M.A. RAZZAK1, M.H. ISLAM1, A.S.M. SAIFULLAH1, R.M. SHAHJAHAN2, K. ENDO3 & AKIRA YAMANAKA3

1Institute of Food & Radiation Biology, Atomic Energy Research Establishment, G.P.O.Box-3787,Dhaka-1000,Bangladesh; 2Department of Zoology, University of Dhaka, Dhaka-1000,Bangladesh; 3Department of Physics, Biology & Informatics, Faculty of Science, Yamaguchi University, Yamaguchi 753-8512, Japan

ABSTRACT

Field studies of butterflies were carried out in 5 selected sites of Atomic Energy Research Establishment (AERE) campus and adjacent areas, Savar, Dhaka, during January to December, 2007and a total of 76 species (10 families) were collected. Among them, 2 species of Nymphalid butterflies, Junonia almana(Linn.) and Junonia atlites (Linn.) were found to exhibit seasonal polymorphism. Seasonal morphs (seasonal phenotypes) were separated based on their dorsal and ventral side of wing patterns, such as shapes (angular/regular) and patterns (presence or absence of eye-spots, color and band patterns) and they are named as dry-season forms (DSF) and wet-season forms (WSF), respectively. DSF were observed from November to February, when day length was shorter than 12 hrs at relatively low temperature (19.6-24.5ºC), whereas WSF were observed from March to October, when day length was longer than 12 hrs at relatively high temperature (25.6-30.4°C). Both J. almana and J. atlites showed similar patterns of fluctuations in their number and polymorphic forms. Ecological and biological significance of WSF and DSF may be apparent on a way of further studies about their behavior and seasonal fluctuations of populations.

Bangladesh j. entomol. (2009) 19(2), 21-32

DEVELOPMENT OF SUITABLE IPM PACKAGES FOR THE CONTROL OF LEGUME POD BORER (MARUCA VITRATA F.) ON COUNTRY BEAN

F. M. A. ROUF & M. A. SARDAR1

Entomology Division, Bangladesh Agricultural Research Institute, Regional Agricultural Research Station, Jessore-7400; 1Department of Entomology, Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh

ABSTRACT

The IPM package – hand picking and destruction of infested flowers and pods with pod borer larvae, cutting of older leaves and twisted young twigs, integrated with spraying of Amamectin Benzoate (Proclaim) 5SG @ 1 g per litre of water at 7 days interval showed better performance in the reduction of 89.36 % flower and 80.53 %pod damage in country bean leading to 44.21 % yield increase. Another package -hand picking and cutting as in earlier package, integrating with spraying of Emamectin Benzoate (Proclaim) 5SG @ 1 g per litre and Neem seed extract @ 100g per litre of water separately at each alternate schedule date at 7 days interval might be considered as another strategy for management of legume pod borer.

Bangladesh j. entomol. (2009) 19(2), 33-44

EFFECT OF VARIETY AND PLANTING DATES ON THE INCIDENCEOF POD BORER (MARUCA VITRATA) IN YEAR ROUNDCOUNTRYBEAN

M.S. HOSSAIN1, M.M. RAHMAN2, M.Z. ALAM2, M.I.H. MIAN2 & S. AKHTER3

1Entomology Section, Horticulture Research Center, BARI, Gazipur, Bangladesh ; 2Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Agricultural University, Gazipur, Bangladesh ;3Entomology Division,Regional Sugarcane Research Station, BSRI,Gazipur, Bangladesh

ABSTRACT

In order to evaluate the effect of variety and planting dates, including their interaction on the incidence of pod borer in year round country bean, an experiment was conducted during  summer and winter seasons of 2006-07 at the farm of Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Agricultural University (BSMRAU), Gazipur, Bangladesh. Five year round country bean varieties namely BARI Seem 3,IPSA Seem 1,IPSASeem 2,IPSA Seem 3 and CB 160 were planted on three different dates (15 April,30April and 15 May in summer and 15 September,30 September and 15 October in winter). Among the varieties, BARI Seem 3 manifested lowest pod borer infestation.15 May in summer and 15 September in winter planting had significantly lower pod borer infestation than other planting dates in both the seasons. Infestation increased with the progress of the season in winter but reverse in summer. In preventing pod borer attack, the best combination was BARI Seem 3 planted on 15 May in summer and 15 September in winter, while the IPSA Seem 2 planted on 15 April in summer and 15 October in winter showed highest susceptibility. The yield was the highest in variety BARI Seem 3 both in summer and winter while the lowest yield was observed in IPSA Seem 3. The year round country bean produced higher yield in winter season than in summer.

Bangladesh j. entomol. (2009) 19(2), 45-60

MOSQUITO POPULATIONS, INCLUDING NEW RECORD, IN THE TEA GARDENS OF BANGLADESH

TOUHID UDDIN AHMED1, JASMIN NUR2& APALA FARHAT NAVED2

1Institute of Epidemiology, Disease Control and Research (IEDCR), Mohakhali, Dhaka 1212 ; 2.Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology,University of Dhaka, Dhaka-1000

ABSTRACT

The mosquito fauna, their distribution and density were studied in three teagardens of Hobiganj and Moulavibazar districts. A total of 1424 resting mosquitoes, belonging to 28 species under five genera, were collected from human dwellings and in few cattle sheds in the morning and evening. The per-manhour catch was 25.43. Maximum numbers of mosquitoes were members of thegenus Culex (73.65%), followed by Anopheles(18.50%), Armigeres (3.85), Mansonia 3.85%) and Aedes(0.14%). The species, Culex vishnui, topped the list. Anopheles philippinensis, An. Annularis and An. vagus, the recognized malaria vectors of plain land of Bangladesh were found. Vectors of both bancroftian and brugian filariasis (Cx. quinquefasciatus and Mansonia sp. respectively) and Japanese encephalitis (Cx. Fuscocephala ,Cx. gelidus,Cx. tritaeniorhynchus and Cx. vishnui) were found to be present.Cx. (Culiciomyia) fragilis Ludlow, 1903, collected in this study in Patrokhola tea garden of Moulavibazar District is a newrecord for Bangladesh. Other mosquitoes found in the population were of nopublic health importance. Absence of primary malaria vectors but presence of malaria cases indicate that some other anophelines may play the role in malaria transmission. Presence of large number of vectors of Japanese Encephalitis and filariasis (both bancroftian and brugian) deserves detailed epidemiological and entomological investigations.

Bangladesh j. entomol. (2009) 19(2), 61-71

EFFECTIVENESS OF SOME INSECTICIDES FOR SUPPRESSINGOKRA SHOOT AND FRUIT BORER (EARIAS VITTELLA F.)

M. R. KABIR1, M. A. HAQUE2, S. K. PAUL3, M. MAHMUDUNNABI4 & N. K. DUTTA4

1Department of Agricultural Extension, Gangni, Meherpur; 2Department of Entomology, BSMRAU, Gazipur; 3Entomology Division, Bangladesh Tea Research Institute,Srimangal; and 4Entomology Division, Bangladesh Agricultural Research Institute, Gazipur.

ABSTRACT

Study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of some selective insecticides forsuppressing okra shoot and fruit borer (Earias vittella F.) during February 2006 to June, 2006 at the experimental farm of Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur RahmanAgricultural University (BSMRAU), Gazipur. The treatments were Proclaim 05 SG@ 0.50 g/l, Proclaim 05 SG @ 0.75 g/l, Proclaim 05 SG @ 1.0 g/l, Shobicron 425 EC@ 2.0 ml/l, Karate 2.5 EC @ 1.0 ml/l, Suntap 50 SP @ 1.2 g/l, Ripcord 10 EC @ 2.0ml/l, Mechanical control and an untreated control. A total of seven applications were done at 7 days interval for each treatment except the mechanical control and untreated control. Mechanical control treatment was applied by hand picking of infested shoots at pre-fruiting stage and removal of infested fruits at 7 days intervals. Proclaim 05 SG@ 1.0 g/l, Proclaim 05 SG @ 0.75 g/l and Karate 2.5 EC @ 1.0 ml/l treated plots showed significantly the lowest shoot and fruit infestation at different stages of crop growth. The highest marketable fruit yield and yield increase over control was achieved from the plots treated with Proclaim 05 SG @ 1.0 g/l, Proclaim 05 SG @0.75 g/l,Karate 2.5 EC @ 1.0 ml/l and Suntap 50 SP @ 1.2 g/l. Significantly the lowest seed infestation, reduction of seed infestation over control and highest seed yield was obtained from Proclaim 05 SG @ 1.0 g/l, Proclaim 05 SG @ 0.75 g/l, Karate 2.5 EC @ 1.0 ml/l and Ripcord 10 EC @ 2.0 ml/l treated plots. The insecticides Proclaim 05 SG, Karate 2.5 EC, Suntap 50 SP may be used for suppressing the okra shoot and fruit borer.

Bangladesh j. entomol. (2009) 19(2), 73-82

MANAGEMENT OF GUAVA WHITEFLY USING BOTANICAL AND CHEMICAL INSECTICIDES

A. A. MAMUN1, M. ASADUZZAMAN2, M.P. ALI3, N. K. DUTTA4 & K.S. ISLAM5

1Agriculture Training Institute, Dhaka ; 2Department of Entomology, Potuakhali Science & Technology University, Potuakhali ; 3 Entomology Division, BRRI,Gazipur 4Entomology Division, BARI,Gazipur ;  5Department of Entomology, BAU, Mymensingh

ABSTRACT

Field studies for suppressing the guava whitefly, Aleurodicus dispersus Russel (Homoptera: Aleyrodidae) by spraying with three botanical oils e.g.,neem(Azadirachta indica) oil, Mahogany (Swietenia mahogany) oil and Karanja (Pongamia glabra) oil and  two chemical insecticides, Admire 200 SL and Emitaf 20SL at different doses, were conducted. All the oils suppressed the whitefly population significantly. Spraying of neem oil @ 5% on the infested plant parts showed higher reduction of whitefly population than other oils. On the other hand, the two insecticides @ 0.12% provided good control of the pest.

Bangladesh j. entomol. (2009) 19(2), 83-89

HOST PREFERENCE AND DAMAGE ASSESSMENT OF PULSE

BEETLE CALLOSOBRUCHUS MACULATUS F.

1M.T. ISLAM, 2M. ASADUZZAMAN, 3M. P. ALI, 4M.A. MUNSUR

& 5M. JAHAN

1&5Department of Entomology, BAU, Mymensingh ; 2Department

of Entomology, Patuakhali Science & Technology University ;3&4 Scientific

Officer, Entomology and Soil science Division, respectively, BRRI, Gazipur.

ABSTRACT

Five pulses as hosts of Callosobruchus maculatus and application of two botanicalinsecticides for ovicidal action were tested in the Entomology laboratory of BAU, Mymensingh. Host preference, adult emergence, seed damage and seed weight loss of C. maculatus differed significantly among the five pulses such as lentil, gram, pea, mungbean and black gram. Maximum number of eggs was laid on lentil (146.00) and minimum onblack gram seeds (38.00). Number of egg bearing seeds was also highest in lentil (77.67) and lowest in black gram (25.00). Highest number of progeny of adult pulse beetle emergedfrom lentil (48.67) and lowest from black gram (2.66). Host preference trend of C.maculatus among the pulses were lentil > gram > pea > mungbean > black gram. Damage by pulse beetle on pulse seeds was significantly different. Maximum number of seeddamage was found in lentil (36.00), followed by gram (30.00), pea (28.33) and mungbean(15.67). Minimum seed damage was found in black gram (2.66). Infestation of C. maculatus displayed significant influence on the weight loss of pulse. Maximum weight loss was found lentil (14.33%) which was statistically similar to gram (12.83%). Minimum seed weight loss was found in black gram (1.33%) which was statistically different from other pulses.

Bangladesh j. entomol. (2009) 19(2), 91-99

DETERMINATION OF PESTICIDE RESIDUES IN BLACK TEA ATDIFFERENT PLUCKING INTERVALS AFTER SPRAYING M. AHMED1, M.S.A. MAMUN2 & S.K. PAUL3

1Chief Scientific Officer, Department of Pest Management, Bangladesh Tea Research Institute, Srimangal; 2&3 Scientific Officer, Entomology Division, Bangladesh Tea Research Institute, Srimangal, Moulvibazar.

ABSTRACT

Experiments were carried out at Bangladesh Tea Research Institute (BTRI), Srimangal, Moulvibazar, Bangladesh, during 2007-09 on mature tea to determine the residues anddegradation rate of some commonly used insecticides (Endosulfan and Cypermethrin)and miticides (Propargite and Ethion) in black tea at different plucking intervals afterspraying to fix the plucking interval in order to keep the residue level at or below MRL(Maximum Residue Limit). A normal and at double dose of above pesticides wereapplied. In the experiment,the initial deposits of residues of Endosulfan were 129.32 and183.30 ppm at normal dose (1.5 lit/ha) and (3.0 lit/ha) at double dose respectively. Theseresidues declined to 0.91 & 2.11 ppm respectively on the 14th day. In case of Cypermethrin, the residues were initially 23.52 & 44.15 ppm in normal dose (0.5 lit/ha)and (1.0 lit/ha)  double dose respectively which declined to 0.05 & 0.58 ppm respectivelyon the 14th day. In case of Propargite, the residues were initially 64.52 & 83.26 ppm innormal dose (1.00 lit/ha) and (2.00 lit/ha) double dose respectively,which declined to0.85 & 1.05 ppm respectively on the 14th day. In case of Ethion, the initial residues were124.09 and 132.53 ppm at normal dose (1.25 lit/ha) and (2.50 lit/ha) double doserespectively. These declined to 0.14 and 0.48 ppm respectively on the 14th day. Thedegradation rate of residues of these pesticides with the increase of plucking days wasnot uniform, rather it was exponential. None of the analyzed samples of normal dose ofPre Harvest Interval (PHI) at 7 days exceeded the MRLs imposed by EPA, Codex Commission, EEC/EU and German Law. However, these double dose exceeded MRLs set at all standards.

Bangladesh j. entomol. (2009) 19(2), 83-89

Scientific Note

MOISTURE CONTENT OF BRINJAL SHOOT AND FRUIT AND

ITS RELATION TO BRINJAL SHOOT AND FRUIT BORER INFESTATION

M. D. H. PRODHAN1, M. SHAHJAHAN2 & M. A. R. CHOUDHURY3

1Entomology Division, Bangladesh Agricultural Research Institute (BARI), Joydebpur,Gazipur-1701 ;  2Department of Entomology, Bangladesh Agricultural University (BAU), Mymensingh. 3Raven Agro Chemicals Limited, Raven Group, Dhaka.

ABSTRACT

Moisture content of brinjal shoot and fruit of twenty different varieties/lines was estimated to find out the relationship between the infestation rate of brinjal shoot and fruit borer, Leucinodes orbonalis Guenee and the moisture content of brinjal shoot and fruit. The highest level of shoot moisture (91.97%) and fruit moisture (95.89%)  Were recorded in the line BLO 72 and the lowest level of shoot moisture (81.65%) and Fruit moisture (89.88%) in the variety Balun. Brinjal shoot infestation was found to be positively correlated with shoot moisture (0.701) and fruit infestation was also positively correlated with fruit moisture (0.695).